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Archive for the ‘Pesach recipes’ Category

matzah almond brittle

19 Mar
Since we eat gebrokts in our family, recipes with matzah meal, matzah farfel, and cake meal, are not problematic.  For those that only eat on the last day, this is a nice treat and easy to make on Yom Tov as it does not require a mixer.
INGREDIENTS
  • 2 cups matzo farfel
  • Vegetable oil for brushing pan (unless using nonstick  liner)
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons salted butter or margarine, softened
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced almonds (5 ounces), toasted

DIRECTIONS

Put oven rack in middle  position and preheat oven to 350°F.

Spread matzo farfel in a  large shallow baking pan (1/2 to 1 inch deep) and toast, stirring and shaking  pan occasionally, until golden, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer to a bowl, then cool  pan and line with parchment paper.

Bring sugar, water, and  salt to a boil in a deep 2- to 2 1/2-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat,  stirring slowly until sugar is dissolved. Boil gently, without stirring but  washing down any sugar crystals on side of pan with a pastry brush dipped in  cold water, until syrup begins to turn golden. Continue to boil, swirling pan  occasionally, until syrup is a deep golden caramel. Immediately remove pan from  heat and carefully stir in butter with a wooden spoon (mixture will rise up and  bubble vigorously). When bubbling begins to subside, immediately stir in toasted  matzo farfel and almonds and quickly pour into baking pan, spreading and  smoothing with back of spoon before mixture hardens.

Transfer baking pan to a  rack. If using a foil-lined pan, cool brittle to warm in pan, then peel off foil  and transfer brittle to rack to cool completely. If using nonstick liner, cool  brittle completely in pan. Break brittle with your hands into bite-size pieces,  or make into a topping: Break into large pieces with your hands, then put  brittle in a heavy-duty sealable plastic bag, seal bag, force out excess air,  and lightly pound with a rolling pin into smaller pieces.

Brittle keeps in an airtight container in a cool, dry place 1 week.

recipe credit: Gourmet Magazine April 2004

photo credit: Sang An

 

 

apple compote

19 Mar

I know this sounds elementary, I mean who doesn’t know how to make compote?  Compote is a dessert which is generally a concoction of cooked fruit with sugar and spices.  It is the staple of desserts.  I don’t think there is a time when I don’t have a container of homemade compote in the freezer.  When my family is full after a meal, there’s always room for compote.  I generally use apples and serve it with a sprinkling of sliced or slivered almonds, but anything goes!  Peaches, pears, rhubarb, strawberries, plums, or a mixture of the above – you name it.  Peel the fruit, slice it and put it in a pot.  Add water about 1/4 – 1/3 way up, put in a handful or two of sugar depending on the sweetness of the fruit and how sweet you like it.  You can always add more water and more sugar if needed.  Then add in a few cinnamon stick and let it cook on a low flame for a couple of hours.   With apples, the longer you cook it, the more it will melt into applesauce and even turn pink.  When plums are in season, I add some to the mixture (pitted but not peeled) and the mixture turns a gorgeous magenta color.  Let me know what your favorite compote combination is!

 

matzah stuffing for chicken or veal

15 Mar

At any given time, I usually have baggies of challah stuffing in my freezer.  I use them to stuff chicken capons, veal breast pockets, and deboned chicken drumsticks.  On Pesach, when I serve my holiday delicacies, I like to have matzah stuffing as a stand-in for my traditional stuffing.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 2 celery ribs, diced
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 6 square matzahs, broken in 1/2″ pieces
  • 4 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsely
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

DIRECTIONS

Cook onions, celery, and carrots in oil until they begin to brown 8-10 minutes.  Run water over matzah until softened.  Drain water by squeezing matzah between the palm of your hands.  Add 1/2 of the vegetable and the eggs, parsely and spices.  This recipe is enough to stuff 4 cornish hens or 1 veal breast pocket.

Topping for chicken/veal: Puree 1 small onion, 2 garlic cloves, 1 Tbsp oil, 2 tsp paprika, 1 1/2 tsp salt, dash of pepper

 

homemade pesach pickles

13 Mar

As far back as I can remember, my mother has made her own pickles for Pesach.  It was a tradition she got from her mother, no doubt because they did not use Passover vinegar or fresh garlic.  I can’t say that I liked them, so I never continued the tradition.  Her pickles would sit for weeks in the boiler room and then on the window sill throughout Yom Tov.  They were soft and mushy inside (practically alive!) and I stayed far away from them.  Now my brother has experimented with his own version and this is the first year that I am attempting my own jars of fresh homemade pickles for Pesach.

INGREDIENTS

  • fresh dill
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 lbs. Persian cucumbers
  • jalapeno peppers, optional, whole or cut, with or without seeds (wear gloves!)
  • 4 tablespoons salt
  • cold water to fill jar
  • If you use kosher for passover vinegar, you can use equal amounts of water and vinegar, and cut down the salt to about 2 Tbsp.

DIRECTIONS

They are quite simple to prepare.  First, I  bought a couple of 8-cup “ball” brand jars with a 2 pc screw on cover.  While preparing the cucumbers, I soaked the rubber part of the cover in hot water.  Start by putting the dill and garlic cloves on the bottom of the jar.  Top with cucumbers and jalapeno peppers.  Pour salt into the jar, fill with water, and tightly screw on the cover.  Store in a cool dry spot for 2-3 weeks.  Store jar upside down for the first 24 hours.  When pickles are to your liking, store in the refrigerator.

note: The pickles were delicious (albeit a bit salty).  By request, I will have to make more next year!!

 

 

chocolate covered coconut macaroons

10 Mar

It’s time to pull out the Pesach recipes and plan what to make for the upcoming festival!  This pyramid shaped confection is the first on the list of many recipes which have become a favorite of my friends and family.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups (lightly packed) sweetened shredded coconut
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup egg whites ( about 6 large)
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 9 ounces bittersweet chocolate (not unsweetened) or 9 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
  • 6 tablespoons heavy whipping cream

 

Directions

Mix first 3 ingredients in heavy large saucepan. Cook over medium heat until mixture appears somewhat pasty, stirring constantly, about 12 minutes. Remove from heat.   Mix in 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract and 1/4 teaspoon almond extract.  Spread out coconut mixture on large baking sheet. Refrigerate until cold, about 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to 300°F.

Line another baking sheet with parchment.  Press 1/4 cup coconut mixture into pyramid shape (about 1 1/2 inches high).  Place on prepared sheet.  Repeat with remaining coconut mixture.  Bake cookies until golden,  about 30 minutes.  Transfer cookies to rack and cool.

Set cookies on rack over rimmed baking sheet.

Stir chocolate and cream in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat until melted and smooth.  Remove from heat.  Mix in remaining 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract.  Spoon glaze over cookies, covering almost completely and allowing chocolate to drip down sides.  Refrigerate until glaze sets, at least 2 hours.

(Can be made 1 day ahead and kept refrigerated in an airtight container, or freeze.)

 

recipe credit: Bon Appetit Sept 2002

photo credit: blessyourheartva.blogspot.com

 

my mother’s famous pesach sponge cake

04 Apr

Today I got to the best part – cooking in the Pesachdike kitchen!  I made 5 recipes of this cake, 3 in tube pans, one on a huge cookie sheet, and one as 3 9-inch rounds.  As you already know, my mother is a cook and baker par excellence.  She puts her heart and soul into the food that she makes and it shows!  This is her famous, classic Pesach sponge cake.  It is elegant served all on its own or you can turn it into a strawberry shortcake by layering with strawberry jam and strawberry whipped cream.

INGREDIENTS:

8 eggs, separated

1 cup sugar

1/3 cup oil

1/3 cup orange juice

3/4 cup potato starch
DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat the yolks in a bowl with 1/2-cup sugar until pale yellow in color. Add the oil and orange juice.
Add potato starch. In a clean bowl with clean beaters, beat the egg whites until frothy.  Slowly add the remaining 1/2-cup sugar, until the egg whites hold a definite shape, but are
not dry. Fold into the yolk mixture.
Pour into a 10” tube pan. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Turn the pan upside down to cool.  Most tube pans have 3 “legs” to stand on.  If yours doesn’t, turn the pan over and center the middle over a bottle that fits into the hole.  Once cool, freeze the cake before removing from pan.

 

payard patisserie flourless & butterless chocolate cookies

04 Apr

These cookies are outragously dark and delicious and almost ridiculously easy to make.  They don’t contain potato starch so they don’t taste pesachdig and there’s never a crumb of these left after pesach!  This recipe was printed in a Feb/Mar 2006 issue of Chocolatier Magazine.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3/4 cup cocoa
  • 2 1/2 cups confectioners sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 Tblsp vanilla extract
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 2 cups walnuts, coarsely chopped

 

DIRECTIONS:

1.  Place rack in center of oven and preheat to 350 degrees.

2.  With the padle attachment mix cocoa, confectionary sugar and salt on low for 1 minute.

3.  In a small bowl, whisk the whites and vanilla.  With the mixer on, slowly add whites to dry ingredients.  Turn speed up to medium and mix 2 minutes.

4.  Using 1/4 cup measure, scoop and mound batter, spacing 3-inches apart.

5.  Place pan in oven and immediately lower the temperature to 320 degrees.  Bake for 12-15 minutes or until small, thin cracks appear on the surface.

6.  Transfer to a wire rack and cool completely

 

Yield:  Approx. 18

 

 

homemade chrain (beet horseradish)

04 Apr

Of all the marvelous recipes I have culled from my machatenista in Antwerp, this one serves me year in and year out.  Although I have yet to use the cloves and bay leaves because I haven’t had them in the house while making it, I hope to do so this year.  When you first taste the chrain, it will seem very sharp but it loses most of its oomph after a few days.  This recipe literally makes enough for a whole year and freezes beautifully!

INGREDIENTS:

11 lbs beets

4-5 lbs horseradish (she actually uses double this amount but this is strong enough for me!)

3 cups vinegar

2 cups water

15 cloves

6 bay leaves

salt to taste

pepper to taste

sugar to taste (With all the sprinkling, I think I put in at least a cup)

DIRECTIONS:

This is the second cooking batch. I didn't have a big enough pot for all the beets at once

1.  Cook beets in water with cloves and bay leaves.  Drain, reserving some liquid.

2.  When cooled, peel and grate the beets on a fine grater.

3.  Peel and grate the horseradish.  Add to the beets along with the vinegar and water. 

4.  Season with salt, pepper and sugar to taste.  Add some of the reserved beet liquid if it seems dry.

 

 

recipes on yumkosher that can adapt to pesach

04 Apr

There are many all year round recipes that can be made on Pesach or adapted to Pesach use.  Here are a couple of great recipes from this blog (both gebrokts) which will enhance your Yom Tov.

HOMEMADE GRANOLAhttp://yumkosher.com/?p=52

Use matzah farfel instead of oats.  Follow rest of directions.  Enjoy with milk or yogurt and fresh fruit.

 

CHOCOLATE CARAMEL MATZAH BOARDS: http://yumkosher.com/?p=551

Substitute the graham crackers for Pesach machine matzoh boards by lining a cookies sheet with the matzah.  Follow rest of directions.

 

pomegranate ice

08 Feb

Ever since I can remember, it has been a tradition in our family, that my mother sends all of her married children and grandchildren platters of dried fruit and nuts for Tu b’Shevat.  This year, my parents are in Florida, so with the help of my 12 year old niece, 9 year old nephew, and my 10 year old son, I prepared 10 colorful platters to distribute to the family. (Thanks Rikki, Yitzy, and Yitzy!)

As one of the shiv’as haminim, pomegranate seeds were included on our platters.  While pomegranate was once reserved for a yearly Rosh Hashana treat, it has become an all year round staple in all groceries and supermarkets as well as a  jewel-like accessory to sprinkle on salads.  I was recently served this pomegranate ice alongside a triangle slice of the Chocolate Lovers Truffle Brownies from Suzie Fishbein’s Kosher by Design cookbook.  It’s a winning combination – with the tartness of the pomegranate ice perfectly offsetting the richness of the cake.

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup water

1/2 cup sugar

2 cups Pom pomegranate juice

1/4 cup lemon juice

DIRECTIONS:

Boil the water and sugar until the sugar dissolves.  Cool

Add the pomegranate and lemon juices.  Freeze overnight.  Defrost 10 minutes.  Blend or process in food processor.

Refreeze.  Check texture before serving.  If necessary, defrost briefly and re-blend.